Life in Poetry reading, writing, reflecting

Life in Poetry reading, writing, reflecting
April showers bring May flowers

Tuesday, 30 June 2020

⌗IWSG, Wednesday 1st July 2020, the future of the industry.

Welcome to another monthly post for the Insecure Writer's Support Group.
If you would like to know more about this very encouraging and supportive writing group

Anyone can join, budding writer, published or unpublished, writer of poetry, short stories, novels, essays ... So give it a go and visit the other members , read their contributions and don't hesitate to leave comments.







Every month, we announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG Day post. These questions may prompt you to share advice, insight, a personal experience or story. Include your answer to the question in your IWSG post or let it inspire your post if you are struggling with something to say.
Remember, the question is optional!!!


Visit our co-Hosts for this month

Jenni Enzor, Beth Camp, Liesbet, Tyrean Martison and Sandra Cox.


Question for 1st July :

There have been many industry changes in the last decade, so what are some changes you would like to see happen in the next decade ?


Good Morning Insecure Writers' Supporters, Welcome to my blog Life in Poetry (on Blogger or Wordpress).
For the moment, I have only published poems and short stories in magazines or anthologies, so my experience of the industry is somewhat limited. Today, I'll be speaking about what I know first hand, then extrapolate about how I hope the industry will stand to make publishing of my Poetry Collection, in the works, and my debut novel, in progress, easier and successful.

Ten years ago, I had to send my submissions by post with a Self-Adressed Envelop, duly stamped. I live in France, so I had to stock up on stamps, the licky kind, each time I was in England on holiday or in Stratford for my Shakespeare seminars. I had to buy sufficient stamps so they would be valid to send 10 pages from England back to France, HA ! The Middle Ages !
Fortunately, around 2013-14, depending on the magazines, Overseas submissions were accepted by e-mail, either with files attached or in the body of the text - which sometimes proved tricky, especially for poems: formatting in an e-mail is HELL !

In the last few years, SUBMITTABLE enables to send work directly to the website of the magazine/publisher so that is a great improvement; many journals, though, still rely on postal submissions or e-mails. In this regard, things evolve very slowly.

Before 2000, only the Open University enabled me to follow creative writing courses at a distance, by post. With the internet, Online, the O.U. adapted its offer and The Poetry School set up very comprehensive courses via platforms and portals, live, but only in writing not with audio or video.
This changed my life: I could finally secure objective feedback on my writing and develop a sense of what budding writers were up to; the first opportunity to share, encourage others and improve my own skills.
Blogging only appeared a little over ten years ago and this has proven to be a wonderful tool to spur on all creative juices. Blog-Hops further provide supporting groups of writers, feedback and a mine of helpful tips, discussions and new points of view, ideas.
I joined the IWSG in January 2019 and discovered a whole new array of incentives, support, encouragements, motivation and prompts. Thank you.

Looking towards the future, for my Poetry Collection and debut novel, I am currently navigating on sight. I know nothing about the publishing process by experience, only by hearsay and reading. It is all new to me. I know there is the option of self-publishing and going Kindle; promoting through platforms online, like Goodreads or Amazon, but otherwise, I'm completely in the dark.

Currently, I am paying for a mentoring programme with Cinnamon Press for my Poetry book, working on content and editing, but there is no contract or guaranty at the end, just tips on how to pitch the manuscript, who to submit it to and how to ' sell ' myself ...
One thing I have decide though is that I don't want to go Indie or Digital, although I realise that, already, many Poetry journals are opting out of paper and publishing only online.

My hopes for the future are that paper and digital will continue to exist and evolve together, the one feeding from the other; that writing software continues to improve, technically, and becomes even more user-friendly; then maybe, just maybe, I'll stop writing with my fountain pen in a notebook. However, this won't be happening any time soon; I would miss the feel of ink on paper which is an important part of my creative process. I'd need a digital fountain pen, write with ink on the page with a paper-thin screen below that recognises my handwriting and transcribes it into type ..... HA !


That's all folks, Have a great summer.
Watching Sci-Fi movies at the moment; I wonder if the 2020/21 batch will yield promising results, integrating, hopefully, the lessons learnt from the present crisis (health, environmental, economical, social and political).

ARIANA, Swedish, 2019, here

ARES, French, 2016, here

France Société Anonyme, 1974, here

Les Derniers Jours du Monde, French, 2009, here

Ad Astra, 2019, US, here

HACKER, Code Pursuit, Danish, 2019 here

Rough Draft, Russian, 2019, here









Tuesday, 23 June 2020

Week #4 of June’s #Poetry Challenge, Wednesday 24th, Carnets de Voyages

Welcome to my Blog life in Poetry.
I am participating this week in Carrie Ann Golden ⎖s Poetry Challenge for the month, on
A writer & her adolescent muse.
If you would like to know more, read here


Write a poem every week on a visual prompt.


Image by Darius Z Sankowski


Carnets de Voyages

In my new red country dress,
I strolled the streets of Glenwood Springs.
A woman stopped me to say
I looked stunning.

I took a photograph of an old typewriter
through an antique's shop window.
On the pages of my travel
notebook, I lay down

my melancholy, my little girl
memories, when we took
that road trip, the summer
I was five.

The Great Sioux Chief smiled
at me, held my hand; 
we shared the wisdom
deep in his eyes.

Forty years later, we gaze,
my three children and I,
into the abyss of the Colorado;
we lose ourselves in the Delicate Arch.

The snapshots pepper my dreams.
They morph into stories on the page,
the tip of my fountain pen
chases down the plot.
©susanbauryrouchard


Thank you for visiting. Heat wave commencing in Toulouse France.


Photos from my travels Out West, 2013.




Glenwood Springs


Dead Horseshoe Point



Delicate Arch, Moab National Park


Wishbone Ash, The King will Come here

Georges Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue, here

Frederic Chopin, here





Tuesday, 16 June 2020

⌗WEP Challenge, Wednesday 17th June 2020

Welcome to my blog, access to all posts is FREE, this site is NOT ad. supported, so block them, the cookies are powered directly by Blogger or Wordpress, so nothing I can do about those. Thank You.

Quote of the Day : 
L'humanité qui devrait avoir 6000 ans d'expérience, retombe en enfance à chaque génération.  Tristan Bernard (French playwright and novelist, 1866-1947)

Man who should have accumulated 6000 years of experience, falls back into childhood at every new generation.

It's time for another Write Edit Publish Challenge of 2020, writing on a word and picture prompt with the Insecure Writers' Support Group.
If you'd like to know more about WEP and IWSG,  or join the Challenge go here and here


IWSG in the 100 best blogging sites



The WEP site


The joint WEP-IWSG Challenge 2020








This Month

URBAN NIGHTMARE

Opting Out


I can see them bouncing off from the UFO-shaped towers in between the glass skyscrapers.
The straggly trees lining the avenues have withered, bearing only yellow leaves on twigs.

I can see them streaming down towards every office window, every cab, every ear-plugged pedestrian.

Then my eyes cloud over, my brain starts to vibrate and ache. I can see kaleidoscope shapes, psychedelic colours. Armies of fantastical creatures sweep down on my thoughts.
My mind accelerates; violent incidents: a stabbing, a snatcher on a bike, a crazy truck crashes into a store front.

A shriek attacks my eardrums and a shower of feathers thump onto the tarmac. No one seems to notice. Then I see a wild-eyed girl run in zigzags, head in her hands. A screeching toddler breaks free from his father's grasp, speeds across the street, miraculously dodges traffic. On the other side, he crouches and slides down the drain opening.

A dog springs out of a bar, sinks its jaws into the first calf it encounters; the body attached, yelps, beats the canine with his New York Times.

Out of nowhere, into the corner of my eye, surges a yellow cab, its wheels squeal to a halt in front of me. The driver sports a long black raincoat, a felt hat, straight out of Mean Streets. He turns his head. Below the rim, an intense gaze locks my eyes. The face is translucent, blue. Then I notice that three pairs of three-digit hands grip the steering wheel. One of them beckons to me to hop in while another reaches over to unlatch the door. I look around me, suddenly decide to trust this strange creature to save me from this madness.

We speed away through downtown, take the tunnel towards New Jersey. On the other side, the blue alien-looking man swerves, twists corners into an industrial estate, I didn't even know existed.
We stop in front of a monstrous building with antenna, towers, electrical spirals: a giant generator.
The blue creature hands me a round green object: the size and weight of a cannon ball.

' What, you want me to blow it up ? '

He edges me on with a nod, eyes twinkling in the sunset.
I step out, run to the fence and chuck it far over in an arc.
The eruption of fireworks, smoke and rain of debris provokes hilarity on the blue creature's face,

' Klock kan Nok 5, Nuk Yok.'
No more 5G in New York.

©susanbauryrouchard   450 words FCA.

Thank you for reading. Happy WEP month.


Leonard Cohen , 

I'm your Man. here


Stop 5 G Appeal  read and sign here

Walking through Toulouse, May 2020

























Thursday, 11 June 2020

Week #2 of the June’s #Poetry Challenge

Welcome to my Blog life in Poetry.
I am participating this week in Carrie Ann Golden ⎖s Poetry Challenge for the month.
If you would like to know more, read here



Image credit: Mohamed Hassan 




Write a poem every week on a visual prompt.

Write a poem every week on a visual prompt.

Alone in the Moonlight

The moon glows in the night air,

it rises from a sea of clouds,

bobbing out of the gloom

like vanilla ice-cream,


a lollipop bouncing in fluff.

A dark wisp of cloud tickles

its ears and then swallows it whole.

The next, cotton wool damp air,



plays with its face, giving it

a moustache, a beard, extravagant

sideburns, a grotesque nose

and crowning its forehead



with a Louis XIVth rolling wig,

a wisp of silver.

And suddenly, from the ebb and flow,

the moon shines out through a break



in the tide, blowing a thousand watt bulb.

Swallowed up in an instant, the moon

falls in a volcano of murky carpet,

disappearing forever.

©susanbauryrouchard






Thursday, 4 June 2020

Week #1 of the June’s #Poetry Challenge

Welcome to my Blog life in Poetry.
I am participating this week in Carrie Ann Golden ⎖s Poetry Challenge for the month.
If you would like to know more, read here


Write a poem every week on a visual prompt.


Photo Credit: Majaranda via Pixabay Free Images

Image by Adrian Lang via Pixabay Free Images




Still Vivid


Frozen in the twilight,
we would sit side by side,
brushing hands.

We gazed over the twinkle,
the lake, a crescent moon
greeted the violet sky.

A breeze from the conifer
ruffled your hair;
I felt your breath

on my bare thigh.
Repressing a sigh,
a premonition crept up;

our last moments together
still vivid in my mind.
©susanbauryrouchard






Angus and Julia Stone, Snow, 2018
here

Hugh Coltman, Stranded, 2012
here


My photos from May 2020


View over our meadow, Dordogne


Wild daisies in front of the house
Of course, the grass hasn't been cut since last July.

Tuesday, 2 June 2020

⌗IWSG, Wednesday 3rd June 2020, SECRETS

Welcome to another monthly post for the Insecure Writer's Support Group.
If you would like to know more about this very encouraging and supportive writing group

Anyone can join, budding writer, published or unpublished, writer of poetry, short stories, novels, essays ... So give it a go and visit the other members , read their contributions and don't hesitate to leave comments.







Every month, we announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG Day post. These questions may prompt you to share advice, insight, a personal experience or story. Include your answer to the question in your IWSG post or let it inspire your post if you are struggling with something to say.
Remember, the question is optional!!!


June 3rd Question

Writers have secrets. What are one or two of yours, something readers would never know from your work ?


My secret is that I have no secrets. I am an open book: my dual nationality, my extensive travels, reading, film watching, music sampling; all come across clearly and unambiguously in my blogging articles, short stories and poems. My political and religious views are splayed out for all to see, honesty, integrity.

' The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog '

Janet Frame's magical sentence, which uses all twenty-six letters of the alphabet, she typed over and over again, when starting her first novel, as a daily ritual.
I have used this sentence repeatedly as a freewrite exercise to get into my writing, and as a tribute to the famous New Zealander poet.
I first discovered Janet Frame through Jane Campion's film An Angel at my Table, which I first saw    in a cinema in Paris, Beaubourg quarter.
I cried buckets and was struck by one episode in particular : she is about 9 or 10 and she is writing a poem about clouds for school, using unusual imagery. Her eldest sister reads over her shoulder and says, ' You can't say that, it breaks the rules of poetry.' Janet looks up at her sister and replies, ' Oh, but that's how I see them. '
It took her a further twenty years to feel confident with her voice and publish her first novel. This scene was , for me, a revelation, the spur I needed to persevere in my writing career.
And that is my secret.

Tell me yours, now.
Wishing you an inspiring June.


Finally free to roam the streets of Toulouse .

Place Victor Hugo


Square Wilson

Visit Elie du Bois, in the Dordogne


bathe in the river


at the lake


write outside in the meadow


Thank you for stopping by. Please feel free to comment, discuss, like or dislike and I will be sure to reply. After the heat, thunderstorms here, in Toulouse. Today beautiful sunny spells, bouncy clouds rushing across the blue with a welcome Easterly breeze.